Where do scholars reside?

Week 27 in ChangeMOOC showed us what a Scholar in Residence gets up to. Antonio Vantaggiato shared the work he started as Scholar in Residence at New York University last summer. This work focuses on exploring the myths surrounding teaching, learning and technology. These are listed in this index – http://zenofteaching.us/2012/03/07/the-index/ and explored further in his slideshare presentation  and associated live presentation .

The work is a ‘book in progress’ on unpicking the myths. Antonio Vantaggiato is sharing his writing on his website  In his words:

The site is done with digress.it, which allows for discussion on each paragraph of the text, and this is what I hope would emerge as a product of participant’s work.

It is by no means an academic, or well-structured research work, but more of a popular discussion. I am using almost no journal or conference papers, but instead, articles from popular media. Plus, the interviews I am conducting (hope to count on you guys in the next future!) add to the ideas elaborated and to the site itself.

I plan to publish in the next weeks the latest interviews (I got Shirky already up, and this week I’ll have another interview done with Mikhail Gershovich, Luke Waltzer, Tom Harbison etc. at Baruch College, etc.)…

Perhaps even more intriguing, at this point than the discussion of the myths – is this way of working, not only because it is being done in the ‘open’, but also because of the departure from the use of journal and conference papers. So the process of writing the book is also an attempt to debunk some of the myths around what constitutes acceptable publications in the bubble of higher education. Presumably Antonio hopes to publish this book when it has been completed – or will the website be the book. I was interested that Stephen Downes regards his website as his book.

So will future scholars reside more on their websites rather than institutions of higher education?