Summer Schools, GIFs and Life Drawing

I have been enjoying Pat Thomson’s daily blog posts about her 5 day course on the Tate Summer School.

I was particularly interested in the making of animated GIFs that they did on the last day, using this software. I have never made a GIF myself, although I have seen a lot, particularly in the outputs from ds106 – an open online course about Digital Storytelling. Pat has posted a link to a Tumblr site where all the GIFs made on her course have been archived. I have to say that I am not a fan of GIFs. When they pop up on a site, I usually wish there was a button that I could push to stop them, so that I could read the rest of the post without distraction. I find the constant quick flicking of images irritating. I think my problem is that I haven’t been able to determine the point of a lot of GIFs that I have seen, other than that they might be seen as a fun addition to a post. But Pat’s post made me do a search for what are considered to be ‘good’ GIFs. I have found quite a few sites where they seem to make more sense, e.g. their use to explain Newton’s cradle  or for advertising as in this Animated Bunny GIF .

Newtons_cradle_animation_book_2 Source of Gif

And I was very grateful to Matthias Melcher when he created a GIF to depict a 3D image of our Footprints of Emergence landscape  (This won’t make sense without reference to the associated research. See Publications and this presentation for research references).

output_CFbB5v

So thanks to Pat for sharing her experience at the Tate Summer School, which sounds a treat, although personally I think I like the sound of a week long life drawing class in London, that a friend has signed up for, better. Evidently according to a recent BBC News article,  life drawing can stave off memory loss, so it would serve a double function 🙂

Update 28-07-15

Here is a link to the storify that Nancy refers to in the comments below – https://storify.com/NancyWhite/the-value-of-memes-in-engaged-mobile-learing-with-